Photo of Maryellen Sun,  MD

Maryellen Sun, MD

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Phone: (617) 754-2559
Fax: (617) 754-2545


msun@bidmc.harvard.edu

Maryellen Sun, MD

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

EDUCATIONAL TITLES

  • Assistant Professor, Radiology, Harvard Medical School
  • Abdominal Imaging Staff, Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Director of Genitourinary Imaging, Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

DF/HCC PROGRAM AFFILIATION

Research Abstract

As Director of Genitourinary Imaging at BIDMC, I participate in both clinical and research liaisons with the departments of Urology, Oncology, Surgery, Radiation Oncology and Nephrology to collaboratively improve the care of patients and advance knowledge in the field. My research investigations in genitourinary imaging have centered about the use of MRI to characterize properties of renal tumors and renal cancer metastases. In an investigation of two-time point dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for subtype delineation in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we showed that enhancement characteristics allow the distinction of the most common types of RCC with high sensitivity and specificity. Another study in the use of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL), demonstrated the value of DCE-MRI and ASL in differentiating renal cell carcinoma subtypes and differentiating renal cell carcinomas from other non-RCC lesions. I am currently investigating the correlation of tumor perfusion, as measured with ASL-MRI, with disease status in patients undergoing therapy with anti-VEGF inhibitors. Further research involves the assessment of treatment response in a cohort of patients being treated for renal carcinoma with stereotactic radiotherapy (Cyberknife). I am also a coinvestigator in a Catalyst-supported study of MR elastography of the kidneys in both normal patients and patients with chronic renal insufficiency. My research interests in ultrasound include contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as well as intraoperative ultrasound, with collaborations with the departments of Surgery and Urology to assess the value of IOUS in pancreatic surgery and in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN). Finally, I am evaluating the role of ultrasound as an alternative to MRI in follow up of pancreatic cystic lesions.

Publications

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  • NĂ­ Mhuircheartaigh JM, Sun MR, Callery MP, Siewert B, Vollmer CM, Kane RA. Pancreatic surgery: a multidisciplinary assessment of the value of intraoperative US. Radiology 2013; 266:945-55. PubMed
  • Lanzman RS, Robson PM, Sun MR, Patel AD, Mentore K, Wagner AA, Genega EM, Rofsky NM, Alsop DC, Pedrosa I. Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging of renal masses: correlation with histopathologic findings. Radiology 2012; 265:799-808. PubMed
  • Sun MR, Wagner AA, San Francisco IF, Brook A, Kavoussi L, Russo P, Steele G, Viterbo R, Pedrosa I. Need for intraoperative ultrasound and surgical recommendation for partial nephrectomy: correlation with tumor imaging features and urologist practice patterns. Ultrasound Q 2012; 28:21-7. PubMed
  • Sun MR, Pedrosa I. Magnetic resonance imaging of renal masses. Semin Ultrasound CT MR 2009; 30:326-51. PubMed
  • Sun MR,Ngo L,Genega EM,Atkins MB,Finn ME,Rofsky NM,Pedrosa I. Renal cell carcinoma: dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging for differentiation of tumor subtypes--correlation with pathologic findings. Radiology 2009; 250:793-802. PubMed
  • Pedrosa I,Sun MR,Spencer M,Genega EM,Olumi AF,Dewolf WC,Rofsky NM. MR imaging of renal masses: correlation with findings at surgery and pathologic analysis. Radiographics 2008; 28:985-1003. PubMed